Tag Archives: Edinburgh

What to do in Edinburgh, the best Edinburgh attractions and places to stay in Edinburgh.

Art Walk Porty Edinburgh

Art Walk Porty is an annual event held in Edinburgh’s seaside district of Portobello. There are walks, artist’s talks, themed shop windows workshops, music and a parade. Lots of local artists open up their homes to display their work to the public (called Art Houses).

The dates for the 2019 Art Walk Porty are 7-15 September. If you’re planning to stay in Edinburgh for attend the event. check out Tripplo UK for hotel voucher codes to reduce the price of your accommodation.

Below are photos of some of the Art Walk Porty 2018 shop windows.

The ‘Carousel’ installation at St Marks Church, one of the Pleasure Ground locations, reminded me of the logo for my Dad’s former toy and book shop called Merrygoround.

The first Art House which I visited, was home to one of my favourite pieces.

The artist, Jude Nixon, had created a beautiful sculptural installation from rice paper panels decorated using paint applied hydrated seaweed.

Another one of my favourite Art Houses was Robin Baillie’s.

Robin’s very large, calm dog took all the visitors in her stride, as she settled down on the floor for a sleep.

I liked the fact that Teresa Gordon’s woman in a swimming costume was a more normal shape than often portrayed.

Teresa’s fish and bird lampshades were striking.

Jenny Martin’s screen printing demonstration was very interesting. Below is some of her work.

There were two artists exhibiting at Art House 36. Karl Stern’s prints were lovely.

Javier Ventura’s pieces were inspired by the former Art Deco style outdoor swimming pool in Portobello.

John Thayer’s geometric pieces appealed to me.

In 2018, Porty Art Walk lasted for ten days from 30 August to 9 September. But most of the events were on during the two weekends.

Orginally, I had only planned to attend on the first Saturday. I had an enjoyable morning visiting several Art Houses and one screen printing demonstration.

I had booked on the Pier to Pier  participatory art walk by Greig Borgoyne at 1pm. I turned up expecting a saunter along the prom, starting at the location of the former pier in Portobello.

Prior to the walk, I had been emailed a link to a video on Vimeo, which was of the artist Greg walking on Hastings Pier taking a few steps then changing direction.

The 16 participants assembled to start the walk,  Greg produced an enormous piece of elastic. Each participant’s video had a different number from one to twenty. Greg explained that we had to space out within the the perimeter of the elastic, trying to maintain tension. The person with the the video numbered one would start off copying Greg;s steps on their video. Everyone else would copy their steps. Once you had lead the walk, you left.

You could either hold the elastic in your hand or push against it with your body.

My video was number 19, so I knew that I was in it for the long haul.

It became really difficult to maintain the tension as the number of participants diminished. This meant that the elastic started to drag in the wet sand on the shore line. I began to wonder if I would end up with friction burns on my hands or body, as I tried to keep the elastic taut. It felt a bit like using a turbo charged Slendertone muscle toning belt. I felt as the event would have been more user friendly, if the elastic hadn’t been so long.

The art walk lasted for 50 minutes. Suffice to say that I was absolutely knackered by the end. My face was the colour of beetroot and I was covered in wet sand.

I was so exhausted, that I had to abandon my plan to visit more Art Houses in the afternoon.

That meant that I decided to return to Porty Art Walk the following day. That turned out to be a good decision, as despite arriving before opening time of 11am on Sunday, I still didn’t have enough time to get around all the Art Houses.

I did attend Greig Borgoyne’s talk on Sunday afternoon, as I was intrigued to find out more about his practice. I discovered that the length of the elastic used in the Pier to Pier participatory walk had been determined by the length of the former Portobello pier.

I thought that Porty Art Walk was a wonderful event. It was very well organised. It felt like there is a great  community spirit on Portobello. All the artists were so welcoming to visitors to their home.

Edinburgh Art Festival

I spent several days at the Edinburgh Art Festival 2018. There was so much to see.

I’ve already written articles about three exhibitions, Liberty Art Fashion and Fabric at Dovecoat Studios, Green Man by Lucy Skaer at the Tablot Rice Gallery and Joana Vasconceol’s Gateway at Jupiter Artland,But I wanted to highlight more of the venues which were part of this art festival.

There was lots on at the Edinburgh College of Art. The MA Postgraduate Show was only on for one week.

Rhubaba Gallery and Studios, in Arthur Street, around half way down Leith Walk had a sound installation All in a Day’s Work by Andrea Zarza.

Further down in Leith was Andy Cumming’s Adam Lunklater: Mythopeia, based on the artist’s research into mythology and the occult.

A couple of miles east in Newhaven, was the Hemispheric Phases exhibition at Edinburgh Sculpture  Workshop, based on a six month exchange between Scotland and Argentina.

The Open Eye Gallery in the new town was exhibiting work by the Scottish artist John Bellany.

Confusingly some art exhibitions were not part of the Edinburgh Art Festival, but part of the main festival. I’d read about one these, Paperwork 5 at the Edinburgh Ski Club.

On my walk back to the car from the Ski Club, I was really glad that I spotted the Six Women in Glass exhibition at Converge

I attended a free Saturday morning workshop at the Partriothall Gallery in Stockbridge, based on the  It Is Incredible How Much Happiness We Sometimes Share Together by the Slip Collective. I didn’t see this exhibition mentioned in the Edinburgh Art Festival programme, but knew about it as I am on the Patriothall mailing list. The workshop participants took a walk along the nearby Water of Leith to collect some flora to use for printing fabric. Below is my piece.

It illustrates that it’s a good idea to look out for exhibitions and events which may not be part of the Edinburgh Art Festival, but take place during the same period.

Malleny Garden in Edinburgh

Malleny Garden is located in Balerno, an Edinburgh suburb which lies 8 miles south west of the city centre.

I’d visited the garden a few times in the past, the most recent occasion being around 12 years ago. I’d been to the nearby Jupiter Artland sculpture park in the morning. I thought that Malleny Garden would be a good place to eat my picnic lunch. It was a good choice. I was hungry when I arrived at the garden. I was immediately attracted to the bench behind some yellow flowers.

It was lovely inside the green house.

There were even some seats for a wet or colder day.

There were some pretty flowers bordered by red bushes.

The yew trees are around 400 years old.

Malleny Garden has a heritage collection of roses. Very few were in bloom when I visited in late July.

Malleny Garden is open every day from 10am to 5pm (or dusk if earlier). There’s a toilet in the garden.

 

 

 

 

Hidden Door Festival in Leith, Edinburgh

The Hidden Door Festival in Leith, Edinburgh ran from 25 May to 3 June 2018. I attended the event on the second Saturday the 2nd of June.

I mainly attended to see the contemporary art exhibitions. Most of the art was exhibited the State Cinema.

I liked the copper panels in the foyer.

It was very colourful in the colonnade of Leith Theatre, across the road from the State Cinema.

I also saw a few performances.

Hagit Yakura – Air Hunger was wonderful.

photo courtesy of Hidden Door

I also enjoyed Claricia Kruithof – Untitled (labyrinth), which was performed outdoors in the courtyard of Leith Theatre.

I made my Edinburgh stage debut at Alice Mary Cooper’s Bean Counter, when I was selected from the audience to play the part of the bean counter’s oath taking official.

photo courtesy of Hidden Door

Dr Neils Garden Edinburgh

08Despite driving past many times, I had never had of Dr Neils Garden prior to attending an art exhibition there. The location is very scenic on the shore of Loch Duddingston a the foot of Arthur’s Seat.

The garden was created in the 1960s by a wife and husband, Drs  Nancy and Andrew Neil, who were local GPs. Some patients of the GP practice volunteered to work in the garden, while others spent time in the garden during their recuperation. The Neils both died in 2005, but had already set up Dr Neil’s Garden Trust to ensure the continuation of the garden.

Not only was there an art exhibition on the Saturday morning when I visited, there were also members of a local art club painting in Dr Neil’s Garden.

The art exhibition was held in Thomson’s Tower on the shore of Lake Duddingston. It was designed by the architect William Henry Playfair, as a storage facility for Duddingston Curling Society.

In 2012 the Physic Garden was created to commemorate the Neils.

Below are some more photos of Dr Neils Garden.

I thoroughly enjoyed my visit to Dr Neils Garden in Edinburgh and plan to visit regularly.

Neil’s Garden is open every day from 10am to dusk. It’s usually free to enter, with donations welcomed. But there may be an entrance charge during special event, so check before you visit.

Raqib Shaw | Reinventing the Old Masters at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

Raqib Shaw’s Reinventing the Old Masters exhibition is on at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art until 28 October 2018.

Much of Shaw’s art is inspired by the Old Masters. In the photo below, you can see Lucas Cranach’s An Allegory of Melancholy on the left, and Raqib Shaw’s take in his Allegory of Melancholy.

I have to say that I was  really impressed with intricacy of the work, and colours of the enamel paints used to create the works. To illustrate this, there are two close-ups of the work below under the photo of the whole work.

The golden light streaming into the top of Kashmir Danae is dazzling.

I attending the June Drawing Room art workshop which was held in the Raqib Shaw exhibition rooms. I was so transfixed by the art, that I didn’t really concentrate of trying to create my own piece inspired by the exhibition.

The Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art is open daily from 10am to 5pam. It’s free to see Raqib Shaw| Reinventing the Old Masters exhibition.

 

Liberty Art Fabric & Fashion exhibition at Dovecoat Studios

The Liberty Art Fabric & Fashion exhibition at the Dovecoat Studios runs until 12 January 2019.

I love fabrics, which is one of the reasons that I enjoying creating collages. I was really looking forward to seeing the Liberty Art Fabric & Fashion exhibition, and I was not disappointed.

I loved the Liberty fabric shoes.

The embroidery on the Art Nouveau style dresses was beautiful.

Admission prices are £9 for adults, £7 for students and unwaged, under 16s are free (but must be accompanied by an adult). Dovecoat Studios is open daily from 10.30 to 5.30pm during August. For the rest of the exhibition, the studios are closed on Sundays.

Joana Vasconcelos’ Gateway at Jupiter Artland

I was keen to see the Gateway exhibition by Joana Vasoncelos, a Portugese artist, at Jupiter Artland. The exhibition runs until 30 September 2108 and is part of the Edinburgh Art Festival.

I was really glad that I arrived at Jupiter Artland soon after the opening time of 10am, as I had the ballroom, in which the rotating Red Independent Heart was suspended from the beautiful ceiling, to myself.


In the garden outside the ballroom was a giant sculpture of a high heeled shoe called Carmen Miranda.

It was constructed with stainless steel cooking pans.

There was a collection of ceramic animals, covered in crochet and lace, on the first floor of the Steadings Gallery.

My favourite was the frog.

The wolf’s mouth was so large that it reminded me a crocodile.

I wasn’t so keen on any of three pieces on the ground floor of the Steadings Gallery.

The one below looked like a kitsch take of a Roman fountain.

The blue one was suspended from two large stainless steel shower heads.

The piece below had too many different patterns for my taste.

Green Man by Lucy Skaer at Talbot Rice Gallery Edinburgh

Lucy Skaer’s Green Man exhibition is on at the Talbot Rice Gallery in Edinburgh until 6 October 2018. It is part of the Edinburgh Art Festival.

The first thing which I observed upon entering the Talbot Rice gallery was that there was so much more light coming in. That’s because the gallery windows had been opened up.

I really liked the flora and fauna inspired paintings in the Green Man exhibition.

It’s free to see the the Green Man exhibition by Lucy Skaer. During July and August the Talbot Rice gallery is open Monday to Friday 10am to 5pm, Saturday and Sunday 12 noon to 5p. But during September the gallery is shut on Sundays.

 

 

Art of Glass at the National Museum of Scotland

The Art of Glass exhibition at the National Museum of Scotland runs until 16 September 2018.

I’d been intending to visit the Art of Glass exhibition for a while. I did pop into the National Museum of Scotland one day before meeting our son for lunch, but I couldn’t find the exhibition. It’s on the third floor in the new extension.

My favourite exhibit was the Glass Cyphers installation by Griet Beyaert and Paul Miller.

Below are more photos of the Art of Glass exhibition.

It’s free to get into the Art of Glass exhibition. The National Museum of Scotland is open daily from 10am to 5pm.