Tag Archives: Edinburgh

What to do in Edinburgh, the best Edinburgh attractions and places to stay in Edinburgh.

A Fine Line at the City Art Centre Edinburgh

You can see A Fine Line at the City Art Centre Edinburgh until 18 February 2018. The exhibition features the work of four contemporary artists who all currently live and work in Scotland.

The exhibition was right up my street, as it questioned the line between art and craft. I don’t think that there is one.

I really liked Lizzie Farey’s willow sculptures.

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Frances’ Priests pottery was intricate and colourful.

I was also a fan of Angie Lewin’s work which consisted of engraving, paintings and screen and lino printing.

Bronwen Sleigh’s work is inspired by industrial architecture and urban landscapes.

You need to check the opening hours when planning a visit the City Art Centre in Edinburgh. At present, it is shut on Mondays and Tuesdays and opening hours vary on different days.

Music from the Balconies – Ed Ruscha and Los Angeles

The Music from the Balconies – Ed Ruscha and Los Angeles exhibition runs until 29 April 2018 in Modern One at the Scottish National Gallery for Modern Art in Edinburgh.

Below are photos of some pieces featured in the show.

It’s free to enter the Music from the Balconies – Ed Ruscha and Los Angeles exhibition. The Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in Edinburgh is open every day from 10am to 5pm.

Daughters of Penelope Exhibition at the Dovecoat Studios Edinburgh

The Daughters of Penelope exhibition at the Dovecoat Studios in Edinburgh runs until 20 January 2018. The exhibition features work by various female weavers and artists.

Below are some of my personal favourite pieces.

‘True Love (Her)’ and ‘True Love (Him)’ were very striking.

‘Shadow series 1-18’ is a piece by Finnish textile artist Aino Karjaniemi. She describes her work as “impressionism in tapestry”.

‘Moss circle/square by Caroline Dear had an ethereal feel.

TI’d have liked to walk through Caroline Dear’s ‘Soundings iv – hearing the reed’s voice’.

Joanne Soroka was the most prolific artist on display at the Daughters of Penelope exhibition at the Dovecoat Studios.

I loved the textures in Soroka’s ‘For Irene Sendler’ tapestry.

‘Water of Life’ is a early piece by Soroka dating from the 1980s.

Another exhibit by Soroka was ‘quick, slow’.

When I first saw Maureen Hodge’s ‘Field of Endeavour, Territory II‘ it made me think of WW1 graves. I watched a video by the creator and learnt that the tapestry was a commission for the new Scottish Parliament building in 2004, in which Hodge examined the concept of home.

Adventures in Space: The Architecture of Science Fiction exhibition in Edinburgh

The Adventures in Space: The Architecture of Science Fiction outdoor exhibition in Edinburgh’s Festival Square runs until 30 September 2017. It’s part of the Festival of Architecture 2017, organised by the Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland.

I took photos of the Adventures in Space exhibition as it was being set up. I didn’t have time to hang around until it was ready, as I needed to drive out of Edinburgh before the start of the evening rush hour.

Below is a selection of photos of the display boards that had been erected when I was there.

If you are a science fiction fan, you should head to Edinburgh to see the Adventures in Space exhibition, preferably on a dry day.

Add It Up Exhibition by Jac Leirner at Fruitmarket Gallery Edinburgh

The Add It Up exhibition featuring the work of Brazilian artist Jac Leirner runs until 22 October at the Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh.

Much of Leirner’s work is constructed of everyday objects. Below are my favourite pieces in the exhibition.

Leveled Spirit consists of 38 spirit levels.

Blue Phase is made of 50.000 obsolete Brazilian bank notes, which are threaded together.

Metal, Wood and Black consists of rulers.

My photo of Little Light, which contains more than two miles of copper wire with a light bulb at one end, doesn’t really do justice to the installation. The patterns and reflections on the copper wire are much more evident in real life.

120 Cords is very colourful.

On the ground floor of the Fruitmarket Gallery, there are also some watercolours by Jan Leirner.

On the first floor, there are several pieces made with the products of Leirner’s former smoking and drug taking habits. The three narrow pieces pictured below are made of rolling papers and their packaging.

Below is my favourite of three Crossing Colours works.

Mark by Mark Wallinger at the Fruitmarket Gallery Edinburgh

Mark by Mark Wallinger is on at the Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh until 4 June 2017. The Fruitmarket Galley is located in Market Street, close to the southern pedestrian exit of Waverley railway station. It’s free to enter and the gallery is open seven days a week, Monday to Saturday 11am to 6pm and Sunday 11am to 5pm.

On the ground floor is the According to Mark installation featuring 100 chairs. Attached to each the chairs is a thread. All the threads converge at a central point on the wall at the front of the installation.

Self Portraits alludes to how all of us can act very differently in various environments and situations.

I am Innocent is a revolving double sided reproduction of Velazquez’s portrait of Pope Innocent X.

Wallinger used his own hands in Ego.

Four of Wallinger’s 66 id Paintings are on display.

Below is id Panting 44.

Below is id Painring 50.

The other part of the Mark by Mark Wallinger exhibition is on at Dundee Contemporary Arts, until 4 June 2017.

Now Exhibition at Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art Edinburgh

The first part of the three year long NOW exhibition is on at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art until 24 September 2017.

A fair part of the exhibition consists of work by the Glaswegian artist Nathan Coley.

It was a bit alarming to see smoke coming for the recently opened Switch House in Coley’s ‘Tate Modern on Fire’.

Another iconic London landmark is featured in Coley’s ‘Paul’

The rear of ‘Paul’ reminded me of a dolls house.

Coley’s installation ‘The Lamp of Sacrifice, 286 Places of Worship’ features cardboard models of all the places of worship in Edinburgh listed in 2004.

I loved the texture and colour of the moon in Jock McFadyen’s ‘Calton Hill’.

In the same room Peter Doig’s ‘Milky Way’ is on display.

Another piece which caught my eye was ‘State’ by Louise Hopkins.

China Red Buffet Restaurant in New Market Road Edinburgh

We had lunch at the China Red buffet restaurant in New Market Road,next to the Corn Exchange in Edinburgh, on a Sunday. We’d eaten at the other China Red in Grindlay Street, next to the Usher Hall, on several occasions.

I was keen to try the New Market Road branch as it advertised a double decker rotational food belt. The opportunity to eat at this restaurant to came when I attended the Edinburgh Art Fair in the adjacent Corn Exchange.

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The portion sizes were small, which was good if you wanted to try something. The resultant large pile of empty serving dished on the table made me feel greedy. It was a bit frustrating waiting for some dish to do the round if you happened to be chatting when it first passed by.

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Most of the dishes which I tried were good. Some of the dishes were lukewarm, as opposed to hot. I mainly stuck to fish dishes, predominantly prawns and salmon. We regularly eat chicken at home, so I try to eat different things when I am eating out. I tried some lamb which wasn’t great.

The only dish that you had to get up from the table to fetch was ice cream.

It costs £15 per adult to eat at the China Red buffet restaurant in New Market Street on Sunday from noon to 10pm. I had a 10% discount voucher, so paid £27 for two diners.

I prefer the more traditional buffet lay out of China Red in Grindlay Sreet, where you go over to the counter to select food. Also the Grindlay Street restaurant is in the city centre; I’m much more likely to be around there than out at the Corn Exchange.

Now 2 at the Scottish Gallery of Modern Art Edinburgh

The Now 2 exhibition at the Scottish Gallery of Modern Art runs until 18 February 2018. Below are photos of my favourite sections of the exhibition.

Michael Armitage’s large oil paintings on lubago (bark cloth from Uganda) were impressive. They depict scenes in Kenya.

Yto Barrada’s photos are of dolls collected by missionaries in North Africa during the 1930s.

It’s the Turner Prize winning Scottish artist Susan Philipz who has the most floor space at the Now 2 exhibition.

Electra features photos of the remnants of Marconi’s wireless ship called Electra, which was built in Leith. The ship was destroyed during WW2.

The other work by Philipsz Seven Tears spans two rooms. In one, there are works made with salt on canvas. My photos don’t really do them justice, as they have texture and sparkle, which doesn’t come through on the photos.

In the other room, there are seven synchronised record players, each of which plays a single note from John Downland’s Lachramae.