Category Archives: England

List of articles with tips for things to do in England; top English attractions, sights and museums.

re london shoreditch double room1

Review of RE London Shoreditch Hotel

I stayed at the RE London Shoreditch for two nights in late May 2014. I was searching for a hotel in the Shoreditch/Hackney area to be to close to the Aegon Retiready event which I was attending for my personal finance blog.

I booked the hotel around ten days in advance of my stay through lastminute’s ‘Top Secret’ hotels. I reckoned that the “4 star jewel in East London’ secret hotel priced at £177 for two nights, on a room only basis, was the RE London Shoreditch, which had a standard price of £238 for two nights. I hadn’t been too bothered if the ‘Top Secret’ hotel wasn’t the RE, as the hotel was guaranteed to be in the area in which I wanted to stay.

It took me 15 minutes to walk to the RE London Shoreditch from Bethnal Green Underground station.

Review of RE London Shoreditch Hotel

I arrived at the hotel a few minutes after the check in time of 2pm. I was hoping for a quick check in, so that I could head straight for the Horniman Museum. I had to queue for around ten minutes to check in. Although I’d requested a quiet room on the lastminute.com booking form, I was allocated a room at the front of the hotel, right above a pelican crossing on Hackey Road.  As I didn’t fancy two nights of disturbed sleep, I decided to go back down to reception to request a quiet room. I had to queue for around ten minutes again. I was offered a room which faced the internal courtyard. However, that room wasn’t ready, so I was asked to wait in the lobby. A receptionist came over to give me key to my new room.

Review of RE London Shoreditch Hotel

I was really glad that I changed rooms. My new rooom was cooler and quiet enough to leave the window open overnight.

I thought that the room was low key but functional and comfortable. There was a fridge which was great for storing milk and fruit. I was glad that I was staying alone, as the duvet didn’t seem wide enough to cover two people.

Review of RE London Shoreditch Hotel

The hotel offers free WiFi throughout but you need a username and password for each device. I was unable to use the WiFi. When I tried to connect both my netbook and mobile phone, there was a “this connection is untrusted” message. I played it safe by sticking to my mobile broadband. I did mention this issue on check out, but was told I was the first person to have a problem with the WiFi connection.

There were some tasty biscuits and drinking chocolate sachets in the room. However, I think that there should be more than two teabags and two sachets of regular coffee in rooms. I doubt if the one small tube of shampoo and shower gel supplied in the bathroom would be sufficient for two people.

It’s a ten minute walk up to Broadway Market, held on Saturdays. Regent’s Canal, Hackney City Farm and Haggerston Park are a few minutes walk west along Hackney Road. There’s a Tesco Express close by on Hackey Road heading east towards Cambridge Heath station. The Geffyre Museum of the home is a 20 minute walk, located next to Hoxton Overground station.

In summary, I was happy with the RE Shoreditch, my room was very quiet for London, clean and comfortable. However, it could be improved by doubling the supply of  toiletries and tea/coffee sachets, a larger duvet and WiFi which doesn’t require usernames and passwords or have security issues.

Review of RE London Shoreditch HotelKeep It Real Travel Review – No Fluff

colonnade town house hotel room2

Review of the Colonnade Town House Hotel London

I booked a room at the Colonnade Town House Hotel in Little Venice through lastminute.com’s ‘Top Secret’ hotels. I was searching for a reasonably priced hotel for a two night stay, in an area I hadn’t previously explored, one week before my stay in late May 2014.

I’d worked out that a hotel described as a “4 star Victorian boutique hotel by Little Venice and Paddington” and priced at £155 for two nights (after using a 10% discount code) was likely to be the Colonnade. This was a massive saving of of £284, compared to the £439 price of being guaranteed that you were booking the Colonnade.

The hotel is located a one minute walk from Warwick Ave Underground station on the Bakerloo Line. It all looked very promising as I approached the Colonnade, the area was beautiful and the hotel exterior impressive.

Review of the Colonnade Town House Hotel London

I thought that the lobby was a bit over the top. There was a cat basket in the corner of the lobby and a friendly cat wandering around. Not ideal if, like me, you are allergic to cats.

Review of the Colonnade Town House Hotel London

Things got worse when I entered my room. It was at the back of the hotel with two frosted white upvc windows with mould in some sections. This made the room so dingy that I needed the lights on during the day. There were two heating/air conditioning units, one in a corner of the room and one under the smaller window (which prevented the blind from coming down fully.) As I didn’t require the room to be heated or cooled, I didn’t investigate further, but I didn’t understand why two ugly units were requried and why they weren’t located in more discreet locations. All in all, the room was not quite in keeping with the touted Victorian luxury town house.

Review of the Colonnade Town House Hotel London

I swithered about whether to go back down to reception to request another room. However, I could see the advantage of the quiet location at the back of the building. I’d read in reviews that the rooms in the basement were noisy as they were above the Underground train tunnel and I thought that rooms on the top floor might be hot. On balance, I decided to stay put.

The room was so badly designed. There was no place for my case. The wardrobe was too small, so I had to lay the case on the floor. There were no free electrical sockets by the desk. I had to unplug the TV to charge my netbook or boil the kettle. There was barely space on the desk to lay my netbook, due to the TV and large lamp. I  ended up sitting the kettle on the carpet and plugging it into the electrical socket by the bathroom door.

Review of the Colonnade Town House Hotel London

There were a few small patches of peeling paint in the bathroom. The bath towels were very frayed around the edges,

There was a safe in the wardrobe, which was large enough to hold my netbook. The free WiFi had a very good signal.

The Colonnade makes a big deal of having a turn down service, where they bring a bottle of water to your room, lay a chocolate on your pillow, change your towels (on request) and fold over the duvet. In my opinion, they need to put a lot more effort into basics such as new towels, providing a suitcase stand and more electical sockets in the bedrooms,

At under £80 a night for a double, my room at the Colonnade Town House Hotel was reasonable value by London standards. I did sleep quite well due to the room being quiet and dark. However, if I’d paid the standard price of £220 for that room, I’d have been livid and left feeling cheated.

Review of the Colonnade Town House Hotel LondonKeep It Real Travel Review – No Fluff

swiss cottage gallery beyond seizures exhibition2

Swiss Cottage Gallery London

When I’m in London, I like to get off the beaten track. I decided to explore Swiss Cottage one afternoon. After lunch at the Tara Tari Buffet Restaurant, I walked over to Swiss Cottage Library. I wasn’t allowed to take photos in the library. That’s a shame, as it has some nice features for a 1960ss building.

However, I was permitted to take photos in the Swiss Cottage Gallery on the first floor of the library.

When I visited in late May 2014, the exhibition was ‘Beyond Seizures’, with pieces by people with epilepsy, scientists and artists.

Swiss Cottage Gallery London

Swiss Cottage Gallery London

Swiss Cottage Gallery London

Swiss Cottage Gallery London

Swiss Cottage Gallery London

If you’re in the area, I recommend a visit to the Swiss Cottage Gallery. There’s an attractive little cafe in the library and free Wifi throughout the building.

scenic train route scotland

Evaluating UK Travel Options with GoEuro

We’ve been thinking of re-visiting Plymouth in Devon, in south west England, for some time. What’s put us off is the journey there.

Evaluating UK Travel Options with GoEuro

Plymouth Hoe by Visentico/Sento

We prefer to take our car for trips within the UK. It costs a lot to own a car, so it makes sense to use it as much as possible, especially as we have an economincal diesel super-mini. However, it’s a pretty long drive down from Berwick upon Tweed to Plymouth and the roads in Devon get pretty congested.

Previously, I’d had a quick look at the option of travelling to Plymouth by train. There is a direct Cross Country train, but the return fare is often near enough £200, which seems excessive.

I decided to check out other options for the journey from Berwick upon Tweed to Plymouth in September on the GoEuro site, which searches through all available rail, bus and air routes.

Evaluating UK Travel Options with GoEuro

It’s cheaper to take the train via London, first travelling there by East Coast and then by First Great Western to Plymouth. But that increases the journey time from 8 hours to around 14 hours. I did think that with a flexible return ticket you could have at least one stopover in London. We could further reduce the train fare if we bought a Two Together railcard, which gives one third off most off-peak fares for two named passengers travelling together. Although this discount card costs £30,  we could save more than the cost on that one long trip.

I hadn’t considered flying, but GoEuro came up with flights from Newcastle upon Tyne to Bristol with easyJet. Surprisingly, even factoring in rail travel from Berwick upon Tweed to Newcastle and from Bristol to Plymouth, the cost was lower than undertaking the whole journey by train. The estimated journey length was around 14 hours, the same as travelling the whole way by train via London.

Evaluating UK Travel Options with GoEuro

I wasn’t very keen on that option. I thought that there was a higher chance of things going wrong with the increased number of connections, e.g. if the train to Newcastle was late and we missed the flight to Bristol, or if our arrival into Bristol was delayed and we missed the train to Plymouth.

The cheapest option was taking the coach via London, which again took around 14 hours. I thought that it was quite possible that there could be delays on the motorway, plus I didn’t really fancy spending so many hours on a coach. At least on a train you can walk around more.

In conclusion, I thought that trying to find the lowest fare for the direct Cross Country train would be my preferred option for travelling between Berwick upon Tweed and Plymouth.

camden lock market indoor1

Photo Tour of Camden Lock Market

Camden Lock Market is another one of these London attractions that I’ve been meaning to visit for years. I decided to walk there from my hotel, the Tune London King’s Cross, via Regent’s Canal.

I have to say that the market was looking pretty tatty on the approach along the towpath.

Photo Tour of Camden Lock Market

It’s quite confusing, as each section of the market apparently has a different name, but the demarcationa aren’t very clear. The first area, to the east of Chalk Farm Road, had ‘Camden Lock Village’ painted on the wall behind the stalls.

Photo Tour of Camden Lock Market

That’s not the only confusing thing. You’d imagine that Camden Lock Market would be on Camden High St, but in fact it’s on either side of Chalk Farm Rd. However, it only takes a few minutes to walk up to the market from Camden Town tube station.

Photo Tour of Camden Lock Market

You get some of the best views of Camden Lock Market from Chalk Farm Bridge.

Photo Tour of Camden Lock Market

There were a number of food stalls in Camden Lock Village charging reasonable prices, e.g. £4 for fair sized main course, with seating on canal view motor bike style seats.

Photo Tour of Camden Lock Market

For me, the only unit in Camden Lock Village which had some character was ‘Planet’ which stocked punk style clothing.

Photo Tour of Camden Lock Market

I didn’t see a name on the two storey indoor market which I entered after crossing Chalk Farm Road.

Photo Tour of Camden Lock Market

The circular window was very striking.

Photo Tour of Camden Lock Market

There were some unusual items for sale; the ‘Record ‘Breakers’ stall sold  clocks made out of vinyl records.

Photo Tour of Camden Lock Market

Another stall was selling old cameras and typewriters.

Photo Tour of Camden Lock Market

The public toilets are just off the first floor of the indoor market.

There was a courtyard area at the side of the indoor market with lots of outdoor seating. One of dining options was paella served from a huge cooking dish.

Photo Tour of Camden Lock Market

The Camden Lock Footbridge was pretty.

Photo Tour of Camden Lock Market

Overall, I wasn’t that impressed by Camden Lock Market. I was left with an impression of a shabby tourist trap selling a lot of overpriced tat. Having said that, on a sunny day it could be quite pleasant to sit out with a coffee or drink by the canal.

battlebridge basin from kings place

Kings Place in London’s King’s Cross

Kings Place describes itself as “a hub for music, art dialogue and food”. I spotted it as I was walking north from King’s Cross station toward Regent’s Canal to take the tow path to Camden Lock. From the exterior, it wasn’t that obvious what it was, I thought maybe a shopping centre, with the Guardian/Observer premises taking up one side of the building. I did some research on Kings Place back at my hotel room that evening and decided to visit on the last day of my stay in London.

On arrival at Kings Place, I went down to the Gallery area to see the ‘Looking Out, Looking In’ exhibition by Lucy Jones.

Kings Place in Londons Kings Cross

Hall One at King’s Place

There’s a cafe and a restaurant with some outdoor seating in a terrace at the back of Kings Place. The tarrace overlooks Battlebridge Basin on Regent’s Canal. There was a £10 lunch offer for a traditional British main course with a drink when I was there.

Kings Place in Londons Kings Cross

Tables on terrace at Kings Place

It was a wet morning, so there were only a couple of smokers out on the terrace, but I can imagine that it must get very busy on pleasamt Summer evenings.

Kings Place in Londons Kings Cross

Swans in Battlebridge Basin viewed from Kings Place

Kings Place in Londons Kings Cross

Sculpture on terrace at King’s Place 

Kings Place in Londons Kings Cross

Sculpture on terrace at Kings Place

When I’m catching a train back to Berwick upon Tweed, I like to arrive at King’s Cross Station around one hour before my departure time. Next time that I’m returning from London by train, I’ll probably walk up to Kings Place, instead of hanging around at the station.

meanwhile gardens moroccan garden

Meanwhile Gardens in Westbourne Park, London

After exploring Little Venice,  I decided to have a walk along the Grand Union Canal heading west to Westbourne Park. Along the route I had a chat with a barge resident who recommended that I visit Meanwhile Gardens.

Meanwhile Gardens in Westbourne Park, London

My favourite part of Meanwhile Gardens was the Moroccan Garden, opened in 2007. The tiled fountain area was pretty.

Meanwhile Gardens in Westbourne Park, London

There were also a couple of rectangular pools.

Meanwhile Gardens in Westbourne Park, London

Further along was a larger pond  with water lilies.

Meanwhile Gardens in Westbourne Park, London

There were some ducklings in the thick long grass at the side of the pond.

Meanwhile Gardens in Westbourne Park, London

So if you are walking along Grand Union Canal tow path, take a short detour into Meanwhile Gardens.

wallace collection

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

I’d been wanting to visit the Wallace Collection in London since I read about it in Margaret’s article on ‘Quirky Collections in London with Free Entry‘ on Europe a la Carte. I finally made it to the museum in early 2014. There’s no admission fee and you can leave your jacket/bag in the cloak room free of charge.

The building, formerly the family home of the Marquesses of Hertford, was bequeathed to the nation in 1897.

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

The main staircase is very imposing.

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

The Courtyard Restaurant looked lovely.

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

I started my visit on the lower ground floor, where there was a selection of modern art. I thought that there was a lot of truth in the words installation.

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

I wasn’t  sure what to make of the next piece. It looked a bit like a giant decorated candle.

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

I thought that the piece below looked like a red jelly breast squished into the bottom corner of a large cage.

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

What I liked most about the Wallace Collection was that it felt like walking through a grand home, as opposed to a museum with exhibits laid out.

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

There were lot of glitzy chandeliers.

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

The Wallace Collection is home to a renowned assembly of armoury.

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

Photo Tour of the Wallace Collection in London

I’d recommend that you visit the Wallace Collection; it really gives you a glimpse into what it must be like to live in a grand home. Especially so if you visit at a quiet time and have a room to yourself for a few minutes.

The Wallace Collection is open seven days a week from 10am – 5pm. It’s located a five minute walk from the Bond Street tube station on Oxford St.

west india quay floating church

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

I’ve enjoyed getting off the beaten track in London and exploring some less well known areas of the capital. This approach started for a couple of reasons. I’d seen many of the big attractions in central London and I decided to look further afield to find more affordable hotels.

Based on recent stays at hotels outside the city centre, here are my tips for discovering London beyond the tourist hotspots.

West India Quay

West India Quay isn’t as well known as its neighbour Canary Wharf. It’s home to the Museum of London Docklands, where you can find out about London’s history as a port in this former warehouse. I learned about the Princess Alice disaster, in which more than 650 passengers of this paddle steamer died in a collision with another vessel in the River Thames. The Museum of London Docklands is free to enter and open every day, except 24 -2 December, from 10am to 6pm.

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

Museum of London Docklands in West India Quay

The West India Quay footbridge sits on pontoons which enable the bridge to rise and fall as water levels change. The bridge looks at its best after dark once it’s illuminated. There are several pubs and cafes with outdoor seating in the Quay. I was there in November, so sat inside to eat my fish and chips at the Via Bar.

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

The West India Quay pedestrian pontoon bridge at dusk

The main meetings as St Peter’s Barge floating church are on Sundays at 10.30am and 6pm, after which free coffee and cake are served during the open forum discussing a theme from the bible.

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

St Peter’s Barge church in West India Quay

Newham

It only takes a few minutes to walk to Newham City Farm from Prince Albert Station on the Docklands Light Railway (DLR). The city farm has been operational since 1997. I found it interesting to watch a blacksmith shoeing a horse during my visit.  Newham City Farm is free to enter and it’s closed on Mondays (except Bank Holidays); it’s open from 10am – 4pm in Winter and 10am – 5pm in Summer.

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

Entrance to Newham City Farm

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

Donkey at Newham City Farm

North Clapham

In North Clapham’s Landor Road you’ll find the Landor Pub, which has a small theatre on the first floor, and the Sew Over It sewing cafe and shop.

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

Sew Over It in North Landor Rd

You can have a Greek feast at Sappho’s Meze Bar, just down from North Clapham Tube station, for around £11. Make sure that you have cash, as they don’t accept card payments.

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

Meze at Sappho’s

Hoxton

I walked to the Geffyre Museum, close to Hoxton Overground Station, when I was staying in Bethnal Green, The museum focuses on the history of the home, with rooms from different periods of history. It’s free to enter, open 10am – 5pm, but closed on Mondays (except Bank Holidays).

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

1960s living room at the Geffyre Museum

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

Art at the Geffyre Museum

Royal Victoria Dock

Royal Victoria Dock, which opened in 1855, was the first London dock to be built for large steam ships. The Dock’s traffic dropped with the introduction of container ships, leading to closure in 1980. It was in the spotlight in 1988 when Jean Michel Jarre, a French electronic musician, performed an outdoor concert there. Excel, the huge exhibition venue, opened close to the dock in 2000. From the dock you can cross the River Thames in the Emirates Air Line cable car to North Greenwich.

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

Emirates Air Line cable car at Royal Victoria Dock

You can try your hand at wakeboarding and stand up paddleboarding

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

Watersports at Royal Victoria Dock

The Crystal is home to the World’s largest sustainability exhibition with ten zones looking at issues such as cities of the future, smart buldings and urban planning. Admission costs £8 per adult and it’s free for under18s or those in full time education. Opening hours are Tuesday to Sunday 10am -5pm, with late opening until 7pm on Saturday and Sunday.

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

The Crystal at Royal Victoria Dock

Regent’s Canal

I’ve walked several sections of Regent’s Canal including from Mile End to Victoria Park.

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

Regent’s Canal near Mile End

I’d seen Limehouse Basin, previously called Regent’s Canal Dock, on many occasions from the DLR train en route to the Excel exhibition centre to attend the World Travel Market. When I was staying in Stepney Green, I finally got around to visiting Limehouse Basin, which was built to enable ships to transfer their cargo onto barges for transportation along Regent’s Canal.

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

Barges in Limehouse Basin

Woolwich

I stayed in Woolwich, as it was within walking distance of Excel by either taking the free Woolwich Ferry or walking through the Woolwich Foot Tunnel, to get across the River Thames.

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

The Woolwich Ferry

At Royal Arsenal in Woolwich, there’s the Fire Power Museum, the Royal Military Academy and the Greenwich Heritage Centre.

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

The Royal Military Academy at Royal Arsenal

Bethnal Green

The Museum of Childhood is located close to Bethnal Green Tube station. I spotted quite a few items from my childhood, such as a Chopper bicycle and troll dolls. It’s free to enter, the museum is open every day from 10am – 5.45pm.

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

Museum of Childhood in Bethnal Green

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

Puppets the Museum of Childhood

Brixton

Brixton Village is a covered market in south London. There’s an array of ingredients for Caribbean cooking and restaurants from around the World. I ate at the Casa Morita Mexican restaurant.

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

Cafes and restaurants in Brixton Village

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

Fruit and veg stalls at Brixton Village

Mile End

The Ragged School Museum was formerly a Dr Barnardo’s school. On Sundays, at either 2.50pm or 3.30pm,  you can attend a 45 minute Victorian lesson. The teacher will be in costume and you can try writing on a slateboard.  It’s free to enter the museum (although a donation of £2 for the lesson is suggested). Opening hours are limited,10am to 5pm on Wednesday and Thursday, 2pm to 5pm on the first Sunday of the month.

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

Classroom at the Ragged School Museum

Exploring London Off the Beaten Track

Victorian kitchen at the Ragged School Museum

I hope that you’ve enjoyed my tour of London off the beaten track.

My Tips on Finding London Hotels

I start my hotel search on a price comparison site, such as HotelsCombined, which trawls through 30+ travel sites to find the lowest hotel prices. My next step in finding a hotel in London, is to check out the websites of large chains such as Accor, which have a good selection of value rooms in various areas in London. I’ve rarely found cheaper prices at hotel chains on price comparison sites.

Once I’ve found some keenly priced rooms, I check that the hotels are located close to good public transport links; I find the Tube or Overground easier to navigate than the bus. Then I have a look at things to do and see in, or close to, that area.

Based on my research, I narrow my options to two or three hotels which offer a combination of a good price, accessibility and location in an interesting area. Before booking, I check if there are any discount codes or cashback available for these hotels.

st pancras lock house1

Walking Along Regent’s Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

My walk along Regent’s Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock didn’t get off to the best of starts, as the first section of the tow path was blocked off for maintanance work. However, I was able to do a detour north through Handyside Gardens, west along Handyside Rd and south down Stable St to reach the steps down the tow path to Granary Square.

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

The ‘Grain Store’ restaurant in Granary  Square

The fountain with 1080 jets at Granary Sqaure didn’t appear to be working. Maybe all the recent rain had flooded the system.

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

The non operation fountain in Granary Square

There’s a lot of construction taking place by the canal including ‘The Coal Drops’  – a retail and leisure develpment which will feature the Victorian arches and cobbled street

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

‘The Coal Drops’ information board

 

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

‘The Coal Drops’ arches

The construction site boarding is decorated with fish.

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

Fishy boarding

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

Narrow boat on the Regent’s Canal

There was more tow path maintenance further along, but this time there was a pontoon provided as an alternative route.

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

Pontoon on Regent’s Canal

Some of the old gas holders are being retained.

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

Approaching the St Pancras Lock on the Regent’s Canal

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

St Pancras Lock house

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

Skull street art by the Regent’s Canal

There’s a mural adorning the canalside wall of the Constitution Pub in Camden, know as the ‘Con in Camden‘.

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

‘Con in Camden’ mural

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

‘Con in Camden’ mural

A bit further along the tow path, there’s what looks like a mural painted by kids under a b bridge.

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

Mural under a bridge on the  Regent’s Canal

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

Space pod style flats at the canalside

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

Camden Lock on the Regent’s Canal

The ‘Guilder’s Stone close to the bridge at Camden Lock bears the inscription ‘originally the keystone of the old bridge built in 1815, removed 1876′. I couldn’t understand the relationship of the keystone to a guilder, which I only knew as the former currency of the Netherlands. I wondered if it was related to a guild (a trade association) for stone masons. When I did an online search, there was a suggestion that there was an error in the inscription and that guilder should have been builder

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

Guilder’s Stone at Camden Lock

There’s some more up to date street art close to the Guilder’s Stone. It was strange to see the role reversal in the piece below; the boy with the large rifle on his back and the soldier carrying the toy rabbit.

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

Role reversal street art at Camden Lock

The face depicted in the tile art looked rather like David Bowie.

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

Tile street art at Camden Lock

Walking Along Regents Canal from Kings Place to Camden Lock

View of Camden Lock from Chalk Farm Rd Bridge in Camden

I’ve also walked along Regent’s Canal from Mile End to Victoria Park and around Limehouse Basin, which was formerly called Regent’s Canal Docks, as it’s where the canal joins the River Thames.