Category Archives: Art

Art in Europe, from street art to art museums.

The Scottish Colourists at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum Glasgow

There’s a permanent exhibition of the works of the Scottish Colourists at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum in Glasgow.

Here are photos of some of my favourite paintings.

Still Life – White Roses by Peploe

Interior – The Orange Blind by Cadell

Roses by Peploe

Barra by Peploe

A Lady in Black by Cadell

The Pink Parasol by Fergusson

Lady in White by Peploe

Torso of a Woman by Fergusson

Casa Oficina Antonio Carneiro in Porto

On my recent trip to Porto, I focused on visiting museums related to art and which offered free or reduced entry with my Porto Card.

Casa Oficina Antonio Carneiro fitted the bill. It’s located in the house/workshop built in 1920 for the painter Antonio Carneiro. The building was also used by Antonio’s sons, the painter Carlos Cameiro, and the composer Claudio Cameiro.

The house/workshop was purchased by the City of Porto, opening to the public in 1973.

I was a bit annoyed upon arrival as the museum is free to enter. I thought that it was a bit naughty of Porto Tourism to imply that it was only holders of a Porto Card that got in free of charge.

The museum attendant was a really friendly lady who kept apologising about her poor English. As I can’t speak any Portugese, I was grateful that she could speak a little English. There were information cards in English.

Below is a selection of my favourite pieces in Casa Oficina Antonio Carneiro.

The closest Metro station to Casa Oficina Antonio Carniero is Heroismo. It took me around ten minutes to walk to the museum from the Metro station.

You’ll need to plan your visit carefully, as the museum is shut on Saturday and Sunday. On weekdays it is open 10.00 to 12.30 and 14.00 to 17.30.

Daughters of Penelope Exhibition at the Dovecoat Studios Edinburgh

The Daughters of Penelope exhibition at the Dovecoat Studios in Edinburgh runs until 20 January 2018. The exhibition features work by various female weavers and artists.

Below are some of my personal favourite pieces.

‘True Love (Her)’ and ‘True Love (Him)’ were very striking.

‘Shadow series 1-18’ is a piece by Finnish textile artist Aino Karjaniemi. She describes her work as “impressionism in tapestry”.

‘Moss circle/square by Caroline Dear had an ethereal feel.

TI’d have liked to walk through Caroline Dear’s ‘Soundings iv – hearing the reed’s voice’.

Joanne Soroka was the most prolific artist on display at the Daughters of Penelope exhibition at the Dovecoat Studios.

I loved the textures in Soroka’s ‘For Irene Sendler’ tapestry.

‘Water of Life’ is a early piece by Soroka dating from the 1980s.

Another exhibit by Soroka was ‘quick, slow’.

When I first saw Maureen Hodge’s ‘Field of Endeavour, Territory II‘ it made me think of WW1 graves. I watched a video by the creator and learnt that the tapestry was a commission for the new Scottish Parliament building in 2004, in which Hodge examined the concept of home.

Adventures in Space: The Architecture of Science Fiction exhibition in Edinburgh

The Adventures in Space: The Architecture of Science Fiction outdoor exhibition in Edinburgh’s Festival Square runs until 30 September 2017. It’s part of the Festival of Architecture 2017, organised by the Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland.

I took photos of the Adventures in Space exhibition as it was being set up. I didn’t have time to hang around until it was ready, as I needed to drive out of Edinburgh before the start of the evening rush hour.

Below is a selection of photos of the display boards that had been erected when I was there.

If you are a science fiction fan, you should head to Edinburgh to see the Adventures in Space exhibition, preferably on a dry day.

Taste Exhibition at the Gallery of Modern Art Glasgow

The Taste exhibition at the Gallery of Modern Art Glasgow opened on 14 July 2017.

Here are photos of some of exhibits.

Overcast cold / upturned leaves / laid on a line in bracken by Andrew Goldsworthy

Hazel stick throws Banks, Cumbria by Andrew Goldsworthy

Campbell’s Soup II: Oyster Stew

Paintings by Beryl Cook

The Glen, Port Glasgow by Stanley Spence

Photography is dead long live painting by David Hockney

The Great Tapestry of Scotland

The Great Tapestry of Scotland is on display in Alloa Library until 18 August 2017. It’s free to see this wonderful pictorial history of Scotland in Alloa.

Below are photos of some of my favourite pieces.

Bank of Scotland founded 1695

Home Weaving, Reeling and Spinning

Listen to the surge of the sea

George Smith founds the Glenlivet Distillery 1824

Paisley Lady

The Great Depression 1930s

Scots in India

William Wallace and Andrew Moray 1290s

The formation of Scotland

The wild wood and its fauna 8500BC

Orkney and Shetland ceded by Denmark to Scotland 1469

Fingal’s Cave

The first Edinburgh Festival 1947

North Sea oil licences granted 1965, Aberdeen, Nigg Bay

Linwood beings production of Hillman Imp

The Great Scottish Tapestry will move to the Verdant Works in Dundee, where you can it from 26 August until 22 October 2017. However, you will have to pay an admission fee to enter the Verdant Works.

Add It Up Exhibition by Jac Leirner at Fruitmarket Gallery Edinburgh

The Add It Up exhibition featuring the work of Brazilian artist Jac Leirner runs until 22 October at the Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh.

Much of Leirner’s work is constructed of everyday objects. Below are my favourite pieces in the exhibition.

Leveled Spirit consists of 38 spirit levels.

Blue Phase is made of 50.000 obsolete Brazilian bank notes, which are threaded together.

Metal, Wood and Black consists of rulers.

My photo of Little Light, which contains more than two miles of copper wire with a light bulb at one end, doesn’t really do justice to the installation. The patterns and reflections on the copper wire are much more evident in real life.

120 Cords is very colourful.

On the ground floor of the Fruitmarket Gallery, there are also some watercolours by Jan Leirner.

On the first floor, there are several pieces made with the products of Leirner’s former smoking and drug taking habits. The three narrow pieces pictured below are made of rolling papers and their packaging.

Below is my favourite of three Crossing Colours works.

Centre Pompildou Malaga Spain

As I ascended towards Gibralfaro Castle in Malaga, I was curious about the coloured glass cube that I could see near the port. The following day, I decided to investigate. It turned out that it was an installation at the Centre Pompidou Malaga.

I found seat in the shade to do some research on the Centre Pompidou Malaga. It opened in 2015 and is the only branch of the Pompldou outside France. I reckoned that it was worth paying the 7 Euro entry fee to see the permanent exhibition, housed in the basement, which focuses on art from 1905 to the present day.

Below is a selection of my favourite pieces.

Stavinsky by Erro (an Icelander based in Paris)

Dora Maar by Antonia Saura

Chapeau a fluers by Pablo Picasso (born in Malaga)

Architecture and Morality by Glenn Brown

I Saw a Woman Crying by Rineke Dijkstra (video of Liverpudlian school kids giving possible reasons for the tears)

The Frame by Frida Kahlo

Self Portrait by Francis Bacon (he looks miserable)

Dimanche by Marc Chagall

El Caballero Espanol by Eduardo Arroyo

Le Mannequin by Alain Sechas

Incubated by Daniel Burden (looking up a the cube from the basement)

Barbed Hula by Sigalit Landau (suffering for art?)

The Girls of My Life by Zush

Femme objet by Peter Klasen

Souvenir de Voyage by Rene Magritte

Formatrice by Victor Brauner

Ghost by Kader Attia (131 foil figures)

Couple by Pablo Picasso

The Irish Jig by Jean Dubuffet

I really enjoyed my visit to the Centre Pompidou Malaga. If you’re into modern art, I recommend that you visit.