How Brexit Will Affect Travel to Europe

As Brexit approaches at the end of March, many UK citizens are wondering how it’s going to affect their travel plans. Depending on whether there is a deal struck between the EU and the UK, travel will impacted in a variety of ways. While it will change holidays in the EU, there is nothing major to worry about. Being prepared for the changes is key. Here is what you should be thinking about if you are planning on going abroad after Brexit.


Flight Prices

Since air travel has been relatively unrestricted between the United Kingdom and EU countries, it is unclear how the flights and flight prices will fully change. Budget airlines rely on this open sky policy, and a deal between the EU and the UK will likely determine how much higher prices will go. Up until now, it doesn’t appear that they will stay the same. The government has a contingency plan for areas that would cause major disruptions. These would affect civilians and businesses, including financial services, air transport, and customs. This preparedness will not reciprocate for EU members, however.

Visas

While the EU has confirmed the British travelers will need to pay for a €7 travel permit, which will be valid for three years. This is a part of the European Travel Information and Authorization Scheme (ETIAS). Every traveler to the EU will need to pay the fee and register 72 hours in advance of travel.

Passports

Passports will also change in accordance to EU countries. The government is recommending that travelers have at least six months on their passports from the day they go abroad. If you renewed your passport before it expired, extra days could have been added. It is best to check how many days you have left on your passport ahead of time. To do so, use the passport-checking tool online.

Travel Insurance

Travel insurance will be impacted greatly by Brexit. European health insurance cards (EHIC). EHICs cover pre-existing conditions and emergencies when traveling. “In the absence of an agreement on future relations that covers this topic, a House of Lords report said, “the rights currently enjoyed by 27 million UK citizens, thanks to the EHIC, will cease after Brexit.”

According to an expert at MoneyPug, a site specializing in cheap travel insurance, some reciprocal emergency measures with EU countries may be negotiated, but right now it seems like individual deals will be struck with each state. While it remains uncertain, the UK government has proposed a law to begin implementing this measure. Without EHIC, purchasing insurance for particular trips will be the way to ensure that you don’t have to pay large sums in an accident, emergency, or illness. Those with pre-existing conditions will need to get specialized insurance.

Mobile Roaming

Under the current rules, mobile data is the same in the rest of the EU as the United Kingdom, but this will change. In the event of no deal with the EU, free roaming will not be guaranteed, but some mobile phone providers, including Tesco Mobile, Vodafone, and O2 have said they won’t charge for roaming in Europe. The UK government has also said that it will legislate to put £45 limits on charges while abroad.

Tour Operators

The Association of British Travel Agents has said that British travelers should be confident to book after March. In a statement they noted that tour operators provide the most comprehensive consumer protection. In fact, travel tours are protected under Package Travel Regulations, which will give you the right of a full refund. The Association of Independent Tour Operators agrees. They suggest booking holidays that have full financial protection. While tours are the safest way to book a holiday, you will still be able to travel to Europe without booking a tour or losing too much money. It is important to know ahead of time how the regulations will change between Britain and the country you are traveling to.

Currency

The relationship between the pound and the euro has already changed, and it will continue to do so. It has become more expensive for British travelers in Europe, and the exchange rate will likely fall more. After Theresa May’s vote to delay the parliamentary vote on December 17th the pound dropped to its lowest in two years, exchanging with the euro at 1.11 pounds.

While many things about traveling to Europe will change, being informed will help you avoid headaches and extraneous charges. Planning is always key to a successful holiday. Don’t allow Brexit to change your plans or discourage inspiration for the perfect vacation. It won’t be as difficult as it seems. Get ahead of it, and start today!